What to expect during Ramadan in Dubai

When we first moved here in 2015, we moved three weeks before Ramadan started. We didn’t quite know what we were getting ourselves into with the hot summer and we really didn’t know what to expect during Ramadan so we just kind of thought well, if we make it through Ramadan and the summer, it’s only going to get better!

I’ve received a few messages lately from people who are visiting Dubai during Ramadan and aren’t quite sure what to expect or what rules etc. they should abide by. So if you’re travelling to Dubai during Ramadan this year and have any questions about what to expect I’ve written this blog to hopefully answer some of those.

Some background on Ramadan

The holy month of Ramadan is the ninth month in the Islamic calendar and lasts for around four weeks. Ramadan moves slightly earlier each year, by approximately 10 days, and the start and end date is confirmed by the sighting of the “new moon” by the Moonsighting Committee. Throughout the month of Ramadan, Muslims must observe several rules including fasting during the hours from sunrise to sunset; praying regularly and abstaining from sex and smoking (although smoking is allowed after Iftar). Charity is also a core element of Ramadan as a time for helping those in need and giving back to the community.

Eating and drinking in public

One of the core requirements of Muslims during Ramadan is to fast during the hours of daylight. That means that those who are fasting (in Dubai) are required to wake up around 4am for Suhoor (the first meal of the day) and they cannot eat or drink until breaking fast at Iftar at around 7.10pm.

As a result, consumption of food and drink in public is restricted. The malls in Dubai have worked to accommodate this and have sectioned off areas specifically for children and non-Muslims to eat and drink at any time of the day and you can find all the normal food chains in there.

Clothing

It is advised that people dress respectfully during this time, especially when in public places such as the malls where you will be surrounded by people who are fasting. It is recommended that individuals refrain from wearing extremely tight clothing and should cover knees / shoulders.

That being said, the public beaches remain open, as well a hotel swimming pools and beaches, and sunbathing is allowed.

Beach clubs / alcohol

During Ramadan the beach clubs don’t play loud / live music in the day and the majority don’t serve alcohol during the day. However, some hotels can obtain special licenses during Ramadan to serve alcohol. At sunset, you will find that the majority, if not all, bars and restaurants will begin serving alcohol – this is usually around 7pm.

Recommendations for Iftar / Suhoor

If you are visiting the UAE during Ramadan, I would strongly recommend visiting one of the traditional tents to experience an Iftar or Suhoor meal. The atmosphere at the Iftar tents is warming and so lovely to see families and friends together during this special time. So here a few recommendations of my favourite Iftar tents to visit, all of which offer a selection of traditional Arabic food, juices and shishas:

  • Majlis at the Madinat Jumeirah
  • The Palace Downtown
  • Atlantis the Palm
  • Dubai Opera Theatre (our company Iftar was held here last year. The setting was absolutely beautiful however the buffet offered a more continental range of food rather than traditional Arabic cuisine.)

 

Ramadan Mubarak

(Blessed Ramadan)